Tyger's Head Books

Posts Tagged ‘navy & shipping’

Shipping dispute with the Danes

In Denmark, Events at sea on September 16 at 2:09 am

16 Sep 1643 (Sat) || You may remember that heretofore we told you how couragiously a Captain of one of the King of Denmarks ships carried himselfe before the pretended Houses, when lately the Earle of Warwick had siez’d on his Ship laden with Armes, telling them that if they detained his Ship, the King his Master would vindicate his cause. And by an Expresse from Hamburg, dated Septem. I. We were this day certified that upon Newes arrived at Gluckstadt, that the Parliaments ships (as they tearme themselves) had siezed on a ship of the King of Denmarks, laden with Armes, and that the said Ship was brought up to London, and there unladen for the use of the two Houses. The Governour of Gluckstadt Count Sents [Pentz] made stay of some of the English Companies Cloth-ships, before the King of Denmarks comming thither: And at his arrivall there the last weeke, the King not onely confirmed the stay and arrest of those Ships, but also was so much incensed at the indignity and affront done him, and his People by them at London, that he caused the whole lading of the said Ships to be taken forth at Gluckstadt, and imprisoned those that were sent downe from the Company there to solicite the release of their said Ships and Goods. This King hath also given order and command into the Sound and norway to sieze all Ships and goods belonging to London, which shall passe by his Dominions, and will keepe them all untill he receive full satisfaction for the great affront done him by the Houses. And now you must expect that the Members will Vote, that what they did was in defence of the King of Denmarkes Crown and dignity, or else that he hah encroached on the liberties of the subject: but the rebels, in my opinion, have reason to rejoyce, for by this staying the London ships at Denmarke, the Cavaliers will want cordage when they should chiefly use it in the service of the State. || John Berkenhead/Peter Heylyn – Mercurius Aulicus (R)

Earl of Warwick allegedly complains to Parliament

In Parliamentary business on September 14 at 2:03 am

14 Sep 1643 (Thu) || It was advertised this day from London, that the Earle of Warwicke had sent Letters of complaint to his friends and factors in the Houses, declaring that he was in much distresse for want of victuals, that his Mariners (never true watermen till now) had dranke nothing but water in foure dayes: and after that, another letter which came unto the Houses upon Monday last, complaining that they are so insolent that he cannot rule them, and that if present monies be not sent them in, they will carry the Ships unto the King… || John Berkenhead/Peter Heylyn – Mercurius Aulicus (R)

Pirate vessel captured at Falmouth

In Cornwall on September 5 at 2:29 pm

5 Sep 1643 (Tue) || From Sea they write, that eleven of the ships which are under the Earle of Warwicks command, and lay all this last Summer upon the Irish and English coasts for the safeguard of them from Strangers, and to hinder the Irish Rebells transportation into this Kingdom, are now returning home to be re-victualled, and stored with other necessary provisions, that so they may returne to their charges againe, for the safeguard of both the Kingdomes all this ensuing winter, And that some of them in their returne, took the greatest ship that now belongeth to Falmouth, with fourteene or sixteene pieces of Ordnance in her, which Falmouth Pyrate had a little before taken another English ship, and was carrying her away to their Den of thieves as a prize, by which meanes she was rescued, and saved from being made their booty.  || William Ingler – Certaine Informations

Parliamentarian ships take Falmouth “Pyrate”

In Cornwall on September 1 at 12:45 pm

1 Sep 1643 (Fri) || From Sea they write, that eleven of the ships which are under the Earle of Warwicks command, and lay all this last Summer upon the Irish and English coasts for the safeguard of them from Strangers, and to hinder the Irish Rebells transportation into this Kingdome, are now returning home to be revictualled, and stored with other necessary provisions, that so they may returne to their charges againe, for the safeguard of both the Kingdomes all this ensuing winter. And that some of them in their returne, took the greatest ship that now belongeth to Falmouth, with fourteene or sixteene pieces of Ordnance in her, which Falmouth Pyrate had a little before taken another English ship, and was carrying her away to their Den of theeves as a prize, by which meanes she was rescued, and saved from being made their booty. || William Ingler – Certaine Informations (P)

Unrest at Portsmouth garrison

In Hampshire on August 31 at 1:16 am

31 Aug 1643 (Thu) || This day we received intelligence, that the Garrison in Portsmouth, (consisting of 350 men onely) are very mutinous for want of pay, being above six weekes behind, which hath so deeply touched the Common Souldiers, that Captaine Thomas, Captaine of the ship called the Swift sure, was most conveniently beaten in the open streets by his owne Sailers, who all cryed, Let us have pay, let us have pay. Nor dare this Captaine offer to goe to Sea, lest his men carry him to Bristoll, as they have often threatened him: and on the other side the Earle of Warwicke (who is now in the Downes) dare not set foot on shore, lest his saylers (of the same perswasion with Captaine Thomas’s) when they have once gotten him a shoare, should keepe him there. || John Berkenhead/Peter Heylyn – Mercurius Aulicus (R)

Dutch convoy approaches Newcastle

In Events at sea on August 30 at 1:31 am

30 Aug 1643 (Wed) || From Rotterdam in Holland they write, that thirteen Hoyes were going from Amsterdam to Newcastle to fetch Sea-coales, and that they had a man of War for their convoy, who carried Armes, Ammunition and moneys thither, which was much admired at, because it is against the custome for a Convoy to do any such thing, and therefore they hope that it will be met with by some of the Parliaments ships, before they can get into Newcastle. || William Ingler – Certaine Informations

Danish ships prevented from landing

In Events at sea, Parliamentary business on August 13 at 11:00 pm

Sunday 13 Aug 1643 || From the Downes it was informed [to] the Parliament by a letter from one of the Captaines of the Navy, that there are three other Ships each of them at least 200 Tonn burthen, lie hovering upon the English Coasts; who he chased, and discovered to belong to the King of Denmarke, and sent hither with Souldiers and Armes to assist the Kings Army against the Parl. to setle the Protestant Religion (if you’l beleeve it) with their other Compeers of Wellownes [Walloons], French, Spanish & Irish Rebells that are already in the Kingdome, they were intended to land about Newcastle but by the diligence of the Earle of Warwicks ships were prevented, and now lie betwixt Calice and Bullen [Calais and Bologne], the Captaine that sent this intelligence desiring the Parliament to grant him Commission and he would use his utmost endeavour to surprize them, which the Parliament accordingly Ordered, and withall apointed that the Earle of Warwick should be made acquainted therewith, and desired to take speciall care to prevent the landing of the said ships in this Kingdome. || William Ingler – Certaine Informations (P)

Royalist prisoners to be transported to America

In London on August 12 at 2:18 pm

12 Aug 1643 (Sat) || According to the Order of Parliament, many of the Cavaliers who have been brought Prisoners hither, are carried down to Wolwich, and put aboorde some great ships provided for them, to be kept there untill they can be transported into the English Plantations in America.  || William Ingler – Certaine Informations (P)

Parliament naval committee fears Royalist ship build-up at Bristol

In Bristol on August 8 at 8:35 pm

8 Aug 1643 (Tue) || The Parliaments Committee for the Navy, fearing now lest the Cavaliers, who having gotten much strong shipping at Bristoll, might send them forth either for Pyrats, or else to waft the Rebells out of Ireland thither, to the endangering of the Kingdome; have written to their Lord Admirall the Earle of Warwicke, speedily to send a Squadron of his best ships, to lie in the mouth of Severne, to stop all ships from coming in, or going forth of Bristoll, which will hinder the designes of the Cavaliers, and totally abscinde their trading by Sea, by which meanes, (together with the late plundering of all sorts of people in that City, as well Malevolents as well-affected, by the perfidious Covenant breaking Cavaliers contrary to composition and agreement) the Inhabitants of that City will be brought into such a miserable Predicament, that they will have double cause to bewail, aswell their own effeminate cowardise, as the Cavaliers Lordly Tiranny over them. || William Ingler – Certaine Informations (P)

Rupert sieges Bristol; ships block Bristol Channel for the King

In Bristol on July 26 at 6:18 pm

26 Jul 1643 (Wed) || It was certified this day, that Prince Rupert having joyned his Forces to his Brothers, and the whole Body of their strength being brought together; they sate downe on Monday before Bristol: and that they began their batteries, and had bestowed no lesse then one hundred shot on the same already. As also that on the going off of the first peece of Ordnance from his Majesties Camp, five Ships which lay in Bristol rode advanced His Majesties Colours on the top of their masts, declaring that they would so keepe the Channell for the use of His Majesty, that neither any supplies should be brought into the Towne by Sea, nor any of the Rebels which were there get out that way. Which proved of such importance to the dispatch of the work that the Town was no likely to hold out long: whereof more tomorrow. || John Berkenhead/Peter Heylyn – Mercurius Aulicus (R)